Furr & Henshaw
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843-213-6737
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803-250-6829
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Hospital Negligence Archives

South Carolina health insurance info now easier to find

When it comes to information about health care, there are many misconceptions. It is important for people to understand exactly what health insurance options are available for them and their families, how health insurance relates to legal issues like medical malpractice and the responsibilities doctors, hospitals and patients share in ensuring everyone has adequate coverage, so we wanted to share this important story on our medical malpractice blog. Fortunately for South Carolina residents, finding this information is easier than ever with Sign Up South Carolina, a webpage that answers many questions about health insurance and helps residents find the right policies for their needs.

Mother of deceased child hopes to pass Leah's Law

South Carolina parents whose children have suffered injuries or died due to medical malpractice may be interested to learn that one parent is working as an advocate for new legislation called Leah's Law. The law, named after the woman's daughter who died after suffering respiratory arrest caused by the medicine provided by the hospital, would require that all hospitals monitor their patients' breathing electronically after every surgical procedure.

Jury awards $25 million to disabled boy for untreated jaundice

South Carolina readers may take an interest in a recent $25 million award rendered by a jury in the case of a boy who suffered severe brain damage from jaundice that went untreated. The boy, who is now 6 years old, was released by a Brooklyn, N. Y., medical center without an exam or follow up, despite the fact that he had rapidly yellowing eyes and skin. The hospital has denied any failure to diagnose jaundice and has pledged to appeal the jury's verdict.

Surgical sponges most commonly left in patients

South Carolina residents may be concerned to hear that in one out of every 5,500 surgeries, patients leave the operating room with a "foreign object" still inside of them, according to widely cited figures from a multi-institutional study. The Joint Commission, which qualifies a large number of hospitals nationwide for Medicare, recently issued an alert for this widespread issue, termed the "unintended retention of foreign objects."

Avoidable deaths in hospitals more common than expected

South Carolina residents may be alarmed to learn that the number of deaths caused by hospital mistakes has been greatly underestimated. While not all mistakes made in hospitals lead to harm to patients or are considered medical malpractice, the fact is that even low estimates state that nearly 100,000 people die annually as a result of errors made by hospital workers. This number comes from the Institute of Medicine's 1999 "To Err is Human" report. According to newer studies, however, that number sorely understates the number of avoidable deaths.

$10 billion yearly tab for hospital acquired infections

South Carolina readers might be surprised to learn that hospital acquired infections cost the health care system in the U.S. $10 billion annually. Approximately one in every 20 patients who have been hospitalized contracts an infection, according to the U.S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Since these types of infections are largely preventable through the use of best practices checklists, high rates of infections might be considered medical malpractice.

Study assesses risky patient behaviors

In a study with implications for doctors and patients in South Carolina, data collected on nearly 2 million hospital admissions conducted by the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg found that those who left a medical facility too soon more than doubled the risk of complications or death. Just over one percent of patients left before they were given permission to do so by their doctors; those patients were 2.5 times more likely to die within 90 days and were also readmitted at three times the standard rate in the 30 days after they left.

Hospitals need to adopt syringe safety policy

Medical consumers in South Carolina will be concerned to learn that, according to Institute for Safe Medication Practices, many hospitals don't have policies in place regarding the safe use of syringes. Reusing contaminated syringes is one of the major causes of the spread of Hepatitis C, Hepatitis B and HIV in medical environments. This hospital negligence is a form of medical malpractice that can gravely harm patients.

Malfunctions cause hospital errors in South Carolina and beyond

Common opinion is that technology and computerized equipment can minimize human error and increase the performance of medical professionals in hospitals around the globe. Yet, one study has found that even technological tools lead to medical errors, and they actually do so at a much higher rate than previously thought.

Unsanitary practices put patients at risk of medical malpractice

When clinicians fail to follow sanitary procedures, they may place the health of their patients at risk. Some cases of patient injury may alarm residents of South Carolina, but knowledge of these types of hospital neglect can help in the identification of cases of medical malpractice. According to a team leader at the CDC Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, cases of infectious disease spread through unsafe injection practices are not as uncommon as once thought.

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Myrtle Beach Office
1900 Oak Street
PO Box 2909
Myrtle Beach, SC 29578

Phone: 843-213-6737
Fax: 843-448-6445
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1534 Blanding Street
Columbia, SC 29201

Phone: 803-250-6829
Fax: 803-254-7513
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